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Associated Press
Protesters rally outside City Hall in Detroit on Monday, arguing that the appointment of the city’s new emergency manager violated voters’ rights.
Briefs

Russian tycoon died by hanging, police say

– A post-mortem examination found that self-exiled Russian tycoon Boris Berezovsky died by hanging, and there was nothing pointing to a violent struggle, British police said.

Thames Valley Police said Monday that further tests, including toxicology examinations, will be carried out. The force did not specify whether the 67-year-old businessman hanged himself.

Once one of Russia’s richest men and a Kremlin powerbroker, Berezovsky fled to Britain in 2001 and claimed political asylum after a bitter falling out with Russian President Vladimir Putin. He became a vocal critic of the Kremlin.

Berezovsky had survived several assassination attempts in Britain and Russia, including a car bomb in 1994 that killed his driver.

Nation

Affirmative action to get broader look

The Supreme Court is broadening its examination of affirmative action by adding a case about Michigan’s effort to ban consideration of race in college admissions.

The justices already were considering a challenge to the University of Texas program that takes account of race, among many factors, to fill remaining spots in its freshman classes. The Texas case has been argued, but not yet decided.

The court Monday said it would add the Michigan case, which focuses on the 6-year-old voter-approved prohibition on affirmative action and the appeals court ruling that overturned the ban.

Day 1 for Detroit’s emergency manager

Detroit’s new emergency manager offered a “sincere olive branch” Monday to local leaders who fought against creating his job, even as a crowd of protesters rallied outside City Hall during his first day trying to revive the city’s beleaguered finances.

Kevyn Orr, a bankruptcy attorney and turnaround specialist who represented automaker Chrysler LLC during its successful restructuring, met with Mayor Dave Bing and at least two City Council members on Monday as he began an 18-month term as emergency manager. Detroit is the nation’s largest city ever put under state control.

Apology accepted for Vietnam visit

The national commander of the American Legion says he accepts CBS’ apology for a passage on “The Amazing Race” where contestants visited the wreckage of an U.S. bomber in Vietnam.

The segment, which aired March 17, angered many veterans, particularly those who served in the Vietnam War. As part of its scavenger hunt game, contestants on the show had to visit the site in Hanoi, which Vietnamese authorities turned into a memorial.

Longtime columnist Anthony Lewis dies

Two-time Pulitzer winner Anthony Lewis, whose New York Times column championed liberal causes for three decades, died Monday. He was 85.

Lewis worked for 32 years as a columnist for the Times, taking up causes such as free speech, human rights and constitutional law. He won his first Pulitzer in 1955 as a reporter defending a Navy civilian falsely accused of being a Communist sympathizer, and he won again in 1963 for reporting on the Supreme Court.

His acclaimed 1964 book, “Gideon’s Trumpet,” told the story of a petty thief whose fight for legal representation led to a landmark Supreme Court decision.

5th Democrat to leave Senate in 2014

Democratic U.S. Sen. Tim Johnson of South Dakota plans to retire at the end of his third term, Democratic officials said Monday.

Johnson, 66, chairman of the Senate Banking Committee, is the fifth Democrat to decide to step aside at the end of the term in 2014. Two Republicans also have said they plan to retire, and the GOP must gain six seats to win a majority.

Obama designates 5 new monuments

President Obama has designated five new national monuments, using executive authority to protect historic or ecologically significant sites.

The sites are Rio Grande del Norte National Monument in New Mexico; First State National Monument in Delaware; Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad National Monument in Maryland; Charles Young Buffalo Soldiers National Monument in Ohio; and San Juan Islands National Monument in Washington state.

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