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Letters

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Letters to the editor

Downtown magnolia worth saving

The city of Fort Wayne will soon have completed its purchase of the properties on the west side of Ewing Street across the street from Parkview Field. The plan is to make the property available for private residential development. Bringing more residents in will certainly add to the already-increasing vitality of our downtown.

Among the many considerations for such a project is the inclusion of green space, and I believe there is a unique opportunity for such space that already exists on this site.

Directly behind the auto repair shop that is now on the corner of Jefferson Boulevard and Ewing Street stands one of the oldest and largest magnolia trees in Fort Wayne. This hybrid variety of magnolia (magnolia x solangeana) has an interesting history that goes back to France during the time of Napoleon Bonaparte. It is also known for its ability to withstand harsh urban conditions and is in the same family as our state tree, the tulip poplar.

I believe that constructing a small public square and using this tree as its centerpiece would provide urban green space, buffer the proposed residential development from Jefferson Boulevard and maintain an open intersection that would enhance the view of Parkview Field and The Harrison.

Keeping in mind that Fort Wayne has received the “Tree City USA” award for 22 consecutive years in recognition of its management of its urban forest, and also recalling the severe losses to the city’s tree canopy from the ash borer and the wind storm of 2012, it would not make sense to disregard a chance to save such a beautiful tree.

WILLIAM WENDLING Fort Wayne

A fight to the death over guns

When I joined the Navy I was sworn to protect the Constitution of the United States of America against all enemies foreign and domestic. Therefore, any attacks on the Constitution, especially the Second Amendment, by some supposedly do-gooders who think they are better educated or know what is better for me is in for the fight of their lives.

When you get people like Paul Helmke who dispute that gun control laws are unconstitutional, they have a major fight on their hands.

What these people cannot seem to get through their thick skulls is that the law-abiding citizens are not the problem and they cannot control the criminal elements.

Pleased be advised that the law-abiding people of this country will only give up their guns when they pry them from our cold, dead hands.

JIM ADAMS Churubusco

Local vendors need support

I agree with Nancy Parker’s letter about satellite markets (“Local markets set for spring,” March 18). The rules and rates have elbowed out some vendors, the hobbyist, the person with excess produce from their garden, the cupcake guy, our talented local crafters and artists just starting out.

For example, to set up at Georgetown last year was $40 for 14 weeks; this year it’s $210 for 14 weeks. Jefferson Point costs $280 for 14 weeks, and downtown is $480 for 16 weeks. On top of that you must produce a certificate of insurance. When did simple farmers markets become big business?

Please support South Side, West Main Street, Salomon’s, East State Village and other markets that have kept their local flavor. And vendors, we have room for you.

JAMIE HOY Fort Wayne

Convention invitation to chaos

As much as I support my good friend and neighbor Sen. David Long’s idea of limiting the intrusive federal government’s heavy hand as it relates to its interference of our state’s rights, I think we shouldn’t rush into what could be another “Occupy Wall Street” chaos on steroids. The clear language of Article V of the Constitution allows the delegates to an constitutional convention to do pretty much as they please.

Who is going to run the convention? Who will pick the delegates? Who will have the gavel? Article V gives us no specifics. All it says is that: “Congress, upon the applications of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a convention for proposing amendments….” Do you suppose Sen. Harry Reid and House Speaker John Boehner will have lunch and work it out? Of course not, so then the Supreme Court will get involved, and who knows what mischief they might decree?

The Indiana Senate has already passed the resolution; it can be stopped in the House. Let your representative know how you feel. Let’s not take a chance. We have passed 18 amendments without resorting to the uncharted waters of a constitutional convention.

JOHN F. POPP Fort Wayne

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