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Associated Press
Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., lead a group across the Edmund Pettus Bridge on Sunday in Selma, Ala.

‘Bloody Sunday’ marked with walk

Biden: Selma beatings shaped him and nation

– Black leaders commemorating a famous civil rights march on Sunday said efforts to diminish black Americans’ votes haven’t stopped in the years since the 1965 Voting Rights Act added millions to Southern voter rolls.

Hundreds gathered Sunday morning for a brunch with Vice President Joe Biden, and thousands were expected Sunday afternoon to march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma’s annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee. The event commemorates the “Bloody Sunday” beating of voting rights marchers by state troopers as they began a march to Montgomery in March 1965. The 50-mile march prompted Congress to pass the Voting Rights Act that struck down impediments to voting by black Americans and ended all-white rule in the South.

Biden said nothing shaped his consciousness more than watching TV footage of the beatings. “We saw in stark relief the rank hatred, discrimination and violence that still existed in large parts of the nation,” he said.

Biden said marchers “broke the back of the forces of evil,” but challenges to voting rights continue today with restrictions on early voting and voter registration drives and enactment of voter ID laws where no voter fraud has been shown.

Jesse Jackson said Sunday’s event had a sense of urgency because the U.S. Supreme Court heard a request Wednesday by a mostly white Alabama county to strike down a key portion of the Voting Rights Act.

“We’ve had the right to vote 48 years, but they’ve never stopping trying to diminish the impact of the votes,” Jackson said.

Referring to the Voting Rights act, the Rev. Al Sharpton said: “We are not here for a commemoration. We are here for a continuation.”

The Supreme Court is weighing Shelby County’s challenge to a portion of the law that requires states with a history of racial discrimination, mostly in the Deep South, to get approval from the Justice Department before implementing any changes in election laws.

That includes everything from new voting districts to voter ID laws.

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