You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Food

  • Time for winter salads
    With fall’s dropping temperatures, it’s time to add more salads to the menu.
  • Thanksgiving math
    Ready for the annual Thanksgiving math quiz? Q. How large a turkey do you need if you are expecting 12 guests (but possibly 14 if Aunt Sue hasn’t broken up with her
  • Passing the holiday torch
    The potatoes are wrong. The football game’s too loud. The kids aren’t dressed right.
Advertisement

Good uses for kitchen waste

How to use up kitchen waste:

Parmesan rinds

Real Parmigiano-Reggiano is pricey, but San Antonio chef Clark McDaniel from Paesanos 1604 makes the most of each block by tossing the rinds into soup. “It gives vegetarian soups a deep, nutty flavor without using chicken or beef broth,” he says.

DIY: Add a Parmesan rind to tomato or vegetable soup as it simmers. If you’re puréeing the soup, remove the rind before you blend.

Corn silk

Elote Cafe in Sedona, Ariz., goes through 200 ears of corn each night, and chef Jeff Smedstad collects all of the string silk to make a soothing tea for his staff. “It helps relieve stiff joints,” he says.

DIY: Steep 2/3 cup silk (from about four ears corn) in 2 cups simmering water for 10 minutes; strain.

Apple cores

The bar at Camino in Oakland, Calif., is stocked with flavored brandies that chef Russell Moore makes himself – using apple and pear cores from the kitchen. “They add sweetness to the brandy without any extra sugar,” he says.

DIY: Put 5 or 6 cores in a jar and add 2 cups brandy or vodka; cover and infuse for at least two weeks. Strain and use the infused liquor in cocktails, or serve straight up as a digestif.

Celery leaves

Chefs know that the best part of celery is the part that’s usually thrown away: the tender light green leaves in the stalk’s center. At Bluestem Restaurant in Kansas City, Mo., chef Colby Garrelts tosses them into salads. “They really are one of the most underused ingredients,” he says.

DIY: Toss celery leaves into a green salad and dress with olive oil and lemon juice; season with salt and pepper. Serve on top of fish or as a side salad.

Advertisement