You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Sports columns

  • James does right by Cavs, himself
    Let’s put aside all the lines about the prodigal son returning home and the speculation about how good the Cleveland Cavaliers may be this coming season or in years to come.
  • Redskins, feds both in wrong
    Now that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has struck a governmental blow against commodified ethnic insults, I’m nervous, because I may have “disparaged” somebody this morning when I buttered my toast.
Advertisement
Associated Press
Bad weather, like the snow storm that blanketed Coney Island – shown in the photo – and much of the Northeast this weekend, should be of little concern when the Super Bowl comes to New York next year.

Snow no fear, Super Bowl

Woody Johnson owns the New York Jets, so he’s no stranger to making big proclamations. Consider this one, just after the New York area won the bid for the first Super Bowl in an outdoor stadium in a cold-weather market.

“I like doing things for the first time,” Johnson said. “I hope it snows.”

Johnson could easily get his wish when it comes to the weather, as New Yorkers were reminded this weekend.

Probably not a foot of snow like the New York area got hit with just days after the Super Bowl in New Orleans. But cold, definitely, with snow more than just a random possibility.

It’s a scenario that will occupy organizers for many long hours. There will be volunteers ready to sweep snow from the stadium at the Meadowlands, portable heaters everywhere, and extra stocks of hot chocolate and schnapps for corporate executives to sip in the stands.

Ultimately, though, it’s not something the NFL needs to be terribly worried about.

The league can do no wrong, and that won’t change just because the elements will intrude on the next Super Bowl. Might even make it more interesting for the 100 million or so people who will be watching in the comfort of their own living rooms.

Football is a game meant to be played in the elements.

Yes, it could be cold. Yes, there could be snow.

And, yes, the game would be better off in Florida or inside a dome.

But the Jets and Giants spent a lot of money to build the new stadium they share, and they wanted a Super Bowl for the New York metropolitan area.

Ultimately that’s what drives Super Bowl selection these days. Owners want to reward owners, and five of the last 10 title games have gone to cities that have ponied up for new stadiums.

Giving one to the New York area was always a little dicey, which is why it took four votes by owners a few years back to give the game to the Meadowlands over bids by warm-weather sites Tampa and South Florida. It came after organizers urged them to “Make Some History” and showed a video that included clips from historic cold-weather games.

Trust the NFL to pull this one off.

Nothing can dent the NFL’s widespread popularity. Not a lockout, replacement referees, or even brain injuries. Certainly not a little cold and snow.

“The plans that have been developed for the Super Bowl, I think, are extraordinary, and they’re just beginning to be released,” Commissioner Roger Goodell said in New Orleans. “We will be prepared for the weather factors.”

Actually, the NFL has some issues to worry about other than the weather at the Meadowlands. Hotel rooms will surely be in short supply and transportation for teams, support staff, media and volunteers will be a challenge.

There are also a ton of logistical worries that go along with putting the most watched sporting event in America in the most congested area in the country, and not everyone is cooperating. The mayors of at least two towns near MetLife Stadium, upset that their towns don’t get some benefit from the facility, threatened in a recent press release not to help with police, fire or other municipal services needed for the Super Bowl unless the NFL writes some checks.

The Super Bowl will not be without problems. Even the NFL can’t make everyone happy.

But let a little cold and snow mess up the first – and quite possibly only – Super Bowl in the New York area?

Fuhggedaboutit.

Tim Dahlberg is a national sports columnist for The Associated Press. His columns appear periodically in The Journal Gazette.

Advertisement