You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Letters

  • Letters
     Bird world Samaritanhas lessons for humansI have always loved birds, and when I read in the paper that Fort Wayne was one of Indiana’s five bird towns, I thought I should share my most favorite bird story.
  • Letters
      Duff's backgroundwill serve FWCS well As executive director of the Fort Wayne Education Association for 22 years, I regularly attended Fort Wayne
  • Letters
     Duff’s backgroundwill serve FWCS wellAs executive director of the Fort Wayne Education Association for 22 years, I regularly attended Fort Wayne Community Schools school board meetings.
Advertisement

Letters to the editor

With D.C. back at work, publicís voice is vital

It is time for Washington to get back to work. Now that the president, the Senate and the House have all been sworn in for their new terms, it is time for the celebrations to end and the focus to shift to solving America’s debt problem.

In 2008 the president promised to cut the deficit in half by the end of his first term. In 2010, the newly elected House majority vowed to cut $100 billion in real spending. And it has been more than 1,360 days since the Senate has passed a budget. Americans should be outraged by these failures. Each second that goes by, Washington is borrowing $52,000 to help finance its overspending problem. Americans are tired of fiscal cliffs and critical deadlines. We in the tea party are calling on members of Congress to hold town hall meetings so the American people can make their voices heard.

A recent Rasmussen poll showed that 62 percent of Americans want to see spending cuts across the board. The American people deserve to be a part of this conversation.

We encourage everyone to call their representatives and tell them to get back to work. And they can start by having a town hall.

EMERY McCLENDON Fort Wayne

Henry shows arrogance with statue proposal

Mayor Tom Henry needs to be reminded of a few things.

He did not get into office by putting himself in there free and clear. He is in that office because we the people chose to put him in there. That makes us his boss, not him ours.

I have seen over and over again and again what the citizens of Fort Wayne have said about Henry’s wanting to move our beloved statue of Gen. Anthony Wayne to in front of the Courthouse at a cost of $100,000. Most have said no to that idea, no matter how it’s paid for.

The statue’s location, Henry says, is obscured by growing tree limbs so to see him better, move him to the Courthouse Green. We the people have said to leave him where he is and simply trim the offending tree limbs at a cost of much less than $100,000.

In my opinion, Henry acts too quickly on matters – without our thoughts and concerns. If he wants re-election, he better start listening to what the people of Fort Wayne want, not what he wants.

RALPH ERHARDT Fort Wayne

Law-abiding gun owners in Obamaís crosshairs

There were more than 500 homicides in Chicago (President Obama’s hometown) in 2012, most of which were committed with handguns rather than “assault rifles.” Many of those were gang-related shootings. Perhaps, before our elected officials try to create more legislation regarding gun control, while there are so many gun laws not being enforced, they should address the problem of gang violence in this country. In one year, more people have died in that city than have perished in this country from mass shootings in the past 20 years.

While some want to put limits on “assault weapons” and high-capacity magazines, consider this. On Aug. 1, 1966, Charles Whitman killed his mother and wife then made his way to the observation deck of the clock tower of the University of Texas in Austin. From that vantage point, he proceeded to kill 14 people and wound an additional 32 individuals. He did this with a sawed-off 12-gauge shotgun and a Remington Model 700 6-mm hunting rifle (with a three-round capacity internal magazine). The problem is not the weapon, it is the nut jobs bent on killing.

While this administration would like to ban certain firearms, is it planning to take back the weapons it allowed to fall into the hands of the Mexican drug cartels they provided in their “Fast and Furious” operation? Stop punishing and levying restrictions on law-abiding citizens.

TODD R. GLORE Fort Wayne

Salt-barrel mixture intended just for streets

With another winter here, out come the salt barrels. Neighborhood associations buy the barrels the city street department so graciously fills with salt. These barrels are placed in areas where the intersections are dangerous and where accidents have happened because of icy streets. School buses travel these streets and carry our children to and from school. Our children not only ride these buses but also walk in the streets.

These hills and inclines become ice covered; for this reason we have salt barrels. The mixture in these barrels is for the streets only – not for sidewalks or driveways, as the mixture will eat away at the concrete. If tracked into the home, this mixture will eat away at the carpet and other flooring. The mixture can also make children, pets and people with health problems sick.

We have had school buses and cars stuck and unable to drive up hills or driving down alleys instead. If you have to take the salt, and your health and the safety of our children do not matter to you, the least you could do is throw some of the salt you are taking onto the street to melt the ice. Or you could contact your neighborhood association to get the barrels placed in your neighborhood. In most cases, all it takes is a phone call.

Then you will have your salt and leave the salt in our barrels for the main reason they are placed at these intersections.

PATRICIA SALLIER Fort Wayne

Aqua Indiana customer has lost all patience

We have lived in Aboite Township since 1979 and never had good water. First we had to install a water softener. Then we had to install a pre-filter to remove some of the rust.

The refrigerator has a filter for the ice cubes and drinking water. As the ice cubes melt in a glass, the white solids float around our glass with our beverage.

The water pressure has been reduced to a trickle many times over the years.

Aqua Indiana has reduced flushing of the older water lines to 30 seconds. They no longer give advanced warning. Also, there is damage to hot water heaters, faucets and the rest of the plumbing to consider.

Do not forget the outrageous cost of the well water that has tripled in the last few years, with the promise of more increases to correct last summer’s problems.

We have tolerated this well water too long. Mayor Tom Henry needs to correct this situation soon.

GREGORY R. BRACHT Fort Wayne

Warmer Earth welcome as part of natural cycle

Not only is climate change real, but it has been going on forever.

I’m old enough to remember when our weather patterns were different than they are today, but I’m also smart enough to know that driving my SUV isn’t causing it. The sun, not coal-fired power plants, is the main driving force behind our climate, whatever it happens to be.

The Earth wobbles somewhat as it rotates on its axis, and the Earth’s orbit around the sun is not uniform either. Plus, the sun’s energy output varies too; ergo, climate change. The earth gets warmer, the earth gets cooler. Glaciers grow and advance over the earth, and glaciers melt and retreat; sea levels rise, and sea levels fall, and it has nothing to do with where your house thermostat is set.

My wife and I visited Jamestown, Va., this past December, site of the first permanent English settlement on the James River. Exhibits there told of how archaeologists determined that thousands of years before Capt. John Smith set up housekeeping, the sea level was a hundred feet lower than it is today. And there weren’t even any smoke-belching factories then.

Who’s to say that current sea levels, temperatures, rain patterns, etc., are what’s supposed to be “normal”? Was the Sahara always a desert? Old maps show times in the past when the Northwest Passage was ice free and open to ships. If it happens now, it’s not a unique event in the history of the earth caused by jet planes making the polar ice cap melt.

And that evil carbon dioxide, supposedly responsible for climate change? It’s considered just a trace gas in the atmosphere. People are getting rich by scaring you.

So relax, people, and go with the flow, climate change, that is. And remember, a warmer Earth is more life friendly than a cold Earth.

KEN SELKING Decatur

Paperís anti-voucher bias shows in reporting

It is amazing to see The Journal Gazette’s education beat writers’ coverage of charter schools failing to get their charters renewed from Ball State. Based on their sterling previous analysis of education woes, you’d think the writers and editors would be saying that this is no time to pull support of the broken system and find alternatives. You’d think that they’d be advocating fixing the schools by throwing more money at them. That would be too consistent though.

Instead, reasonable people are left to the conclusion that based on The Journal Gazette’s reporting (“Charters’ test scores miss mark,” Jan. 27), it is only OK for public schools to waste money on failing education. It is further amazing that in Sunday’s article, they were even advertising for “more traditional” education choices like a few of the area public school districts (EACS and FWCS), that have closed schools of their own and flip-flop their entire philosophy on education every few years.

The voting public overwhelmingly supports the state legislature that put charter and voucher programs in place to help offset the cost for families trying to escape these failing public school cultures. Those moves have been criticized every step of the way by The Journal Gazette. The only thing negative about vouchers that I have yet to see from the JG (or the American Civil Liberties Union, for that matter) is questioning the discrimination of the voucher rules that only keep students already too closely associated with non-public education from being eligible. It is no wonder that FWCS especially will fail to be challenged with a local newspaper that is their best buddy.

JOE KIMES Fort Wayne

Advertisement