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Associated Press
Director, writer and cast member Lake Bell celebrates as she comes on stage

'Fruitvale,' 'Blood Brother' win Sundance Awards

PARK CITY, Utah — The dramatic film "Fruitvale" and the documentary "Blood Brother" won over audiences and Sundance Film Festival judges.

Both American films won audience awards and grand jury prizes Saturday at the Sundance Awards.

"Fruitvale" tells the true story of Oscar Grant, who was 22 years old when he was shot and killed in a public transit station in Oakland, Calif. Twenty-six-year-old first-time filmmaker Ryan Coogler wrote and directed the dramatic narrative.

"Blood Brother" follows a young American, Rocky, who moved to India to work with orphans infected with HIV.

The Cambodian film "A River Changes Course" won the grand jury prize for international documentary, and a narrative film from South Korea, "Jiseul," claimed the grand jury prize for dramatic world cinema.

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