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Associated Press
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., is introducing a ban on assault weapons, but it faces long odds even after last month’s Newtown, Conn., mass shooting.

Weapons, ammo ban begins its uphill battle

– Congressional Democrats unveiled legislation Thursday to ban assault weapons and high-capacity magazines like those used in the school massacre at Newtown, Conn., even as they acknowledged an uphill battle getting the measures through a divided Congress.

The group led by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., called on the public to get behind their effort, saying that is the only way they will prevail over opposition from the well-organized National Rifle Association and its congressional allies.

“This is really an uphill road. If anyone asked today, ‘Can you win this?’ the answer is, ‘We don’t know, it’s so uphill,’ ” Feinstein said at a Capitol Hill news conference backed by police chiefs, mayors and crime victims.

“There is one great hope out there. And that is you because you are stronger than the gun lobby. You are stronger than the gun manufacturers. But only if you stand up.”

Feinstein’s legislation comes a week after President Obama unveiled a package of gun control measures including a ban on assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, and it marks the start of tense congressional debate with no certain conclusion.

In addition to NRA opposition, Feinstein and her supporters must contend with the Republican-controlled House, where leaders have shown scant interest in gun measures. Perhaps even more daunting, fellow Democrats from rural states where voters strongly support gun rights have deep concerns about her measure.

Even Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has expressed skepticism the assault weapons ban could get through Congress. Some advocacy groups are focusing their attention instead on expanding background checks, which is seen as more doable politically.

Feinstein’s legislation is written comprehensively to cover rifles, pistols and handguns with one of any military-style features like detachable stock, pistol grips or grenade launchers. It also bans 157 specific firearms, while excluding 2,258 hunting and sporting rifles and shotguns. And it bans magazines that accept more than 10 rounds.

Feinstein aimed to improve upon the previous assault weapons ban she authored, which expired in 2004. Original passage of that bill in 1994 was blamed for costing Democrats control of the House and Senate after they supported it. There’s also considerable debate about its effectiveness during the years it was in effect, in part because of loopholes that allowed gun manufacturers to work around it.

The NRA responded that the new bill would infringe on the constitutional right to bear arms.

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