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Associated Press
French Mirage aircraft fly to northern Mali overnight Friday before beginning aerial bombardments against the al-Qaida-linked groups controlling it.

French drive back rebels and push up intervention

– The battle to retake Mali’s north from the al-Qaida-linked groups controlling it began in earnest Saturday, after hundreds of French forces deployed to the country and began aerial bombardments to drive back the Islamic extremists.

At the same time, nations in West Africa authorized the immediate deployment of troops to Mali, fast-forwarding a military intervention that was not due to start until September.

The decision to begin the military operation was taken after the fighters, who seized the northern half of Mali nine months ago, decided last week to push even farther south to the town of Konna, coming within 30 miles of Mopti, a major base for the Malian military.

Many believe that if Mopti were to fall, the Islamists could potentially seize the rest of the country, dramatically raising the stakes. The potential outcome was “a terrorist state at the doorstep of France and Europe,” French Defense Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said Saturday.

France scrambled Mirage fighter jets from a base in neighboring Chad, beginning the aerial assault on Friday. They have also sent in hundreds of troops to the front line, as well as to secure the capital. In just 24 hours, French forces succeeded in dispersing the Islamists from Konna, the town the fighters had seized in a bold advance earlier in the week, Le Drian said.

Malian military officials said they were now conducting sweeps, looking for snipers.

“A halting blow has been delivered, and heavy losses have been inflicted on our adversaries, but our mission is not complete,” French President Francois Hollande said after a three-hour meeting with his defense chiefs in Paris. “I reiterate that it consists of preparing the deployment of an African intervention force to allow Mali to recover its territorial integrity.”

However, in a sign of how hard the battle ahead may be, the extremists succeeded in shooting down a French helicopter, the defense minister confirmed. The pilot died of his wounds while he was being evacuated.

The Islamists are using arms stolen from ex-Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi’s arsenal, as well as the weapons abandoned by Mali’s military when they fled their posts in the face of the rebel advance.

They have outfitted SUVs with high-caliber machine guns and have released videos displaying their collection of anti-aircraft weapons.

The Islamists have vowed to retaliate against French interests, and they claim to have sleeper cells in all of the capitals of the West African nations who are sending troops. Hollande announced that he had raised France’s domestic terror threat level.

The sudden military operation is a reversal of months of debate over whether or not Western powers should get involved in a military bid to oust the militants, who took advantage of a coup in Mali’s capital in March to capture the north. As recently as December, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon cautioned against a quick military operation. Diplomats said that September would be the earliest the operation could take place.

All of that went out the window this week when the fighters pushed south from the town of Douentza, which demarcated their line of control, located 540 miles from the capital. By Thursday, they had succeeded in pushing another 72 miles south, bringing them nearly face-to-face with the ill-equipped and ill-trained Malian military in a showdown that couldn’t be ignored by the international community.

In Washington, a U.S. official confirmed that the country has offered to send drones to Mali. The official could not be named because he wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter publicly.

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