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Indianapolis Colts mascot Blue at Leo Elementary, Friday.

Indianapolis Colts mascot Blue at Leo Elementary, Friday.

Samuel Hoffman | The Journal Gazette
With right paw raised, Colts mascot Blue leads Leo Elementary students in a pledge to respect others Friday.

Kids get fun, prideful life lessons from Colts mascot

LEO-CEDARVILLE – The shouts and laughter from students at Leo Elementary were deafening Friday during a visit from the Indianapolis Colts’ mascot, Blue.

Blue and his master of ceremonies presented the team’s P.R.I.D.E. program, a character education program emphasizing physical health, positive decision-making, respect and staying in school.

A parent told Bria Booker, student assistant specialist with the school, about the program. After some research, Booker said the program sounded like a fun and entertaining way to teach kids positive lessons. Booker submitted a request for the program to be brought to Leo, and the school, along with nearby Cedarville Elementary, was chosen.

The program uses each letter in P.R.I.D.E. to teach lessons about physical exercise, respect, intelligent decisions – like refraining from drug and alcohol use – diet and education. Students took pledges, promising to abide by each lesson.

“It was a good overall message for our students to hear,” Booker said.

And it appeared that students had fun while learning the lessons.

Kids answered questions and participated in activities related to each lesson. Volunteers, including some teachers, also earned wristbands.

Students particularly enjoyed Blue’s dance moves, as well as when he brought fourth-grade teacher Cari Kaylor to dance the Macarena and the chicken dance. Blue then asked Kaylor for a hug after which he grabbed Kaylor and pretended to kiss her while students howled with laughter.

Blue’s master of ceremonies told students that if they followed the lessons presented, Blue could return to the school for an end-of-the-year party that would include visits from some Indianapolis Colts players and cheerleaders.

sarah.janssen@jg.net

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