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Briefs

McChrystal takes blame for article

– Speaking out for the first time since he resigned, retired Gen. Stanley McChrystal takes the blame for a Rolling Stone magazine article and the unflattering comments attributed to his staff about the Obama administration that ended his Afghanistan command and army career.

“Regardless of how I judged the story for fairness or accuracy, responsibility was mine,” McChrystal writes in his new memoir, in a carefully worded denouncement of the story.

The Rolling Stone article anonymously quoted McChrystal’s aides as criticizing Obama’s team, including Vice President Joe Biden. Biden had disagreed with McChrystal’s strategy that called for more troops in Afghanistan. Biden preferred to send a smaller counterterrorism and training force – a policy the White House is now considering as it transitions troops from the Afghan war.

McChrystal adds the choice to resign as U.S. commander in Afghanistan was his own.

Crews search for Italian CEO’s plane

Rescue crews used boats and aircraft on Saturday to search for a small plane that disappeared off Venezuela carrying the CEO of Italy’s iconic Missoni fashion house and five other people.

But more than a day after the BN-2 Islander aircraft disappeared from radar screens on its short flight from the Venezuelan resort islands of Los Roques to Caracas, no sign of the plane had been found, officials said.

“We have no other news” about the plane carrying 58-year-old Vittorio Missoni, the head of the company; his wife, Maurizia Castiglioni; two of their Italian friends; and two Venezuelan crew members, said Paolo Marchetti, a Missoni SpA official.

Unruly passenger restrained on flight

Icelandair said it had to restrain a passenger on a flight from Reykjavik to New York City because he was hitting people, screaming profanities and spitting.

Thursday’s flight was getting media attention after a photograph began circulating on the Internet purporting to show the passenger tied to his seat with tape and plastic restraints.

The man who posted the picture to his Tumblr, Andy Ellwood, said it was taken by a friend on the flight.

Bidders emerge to purchase Hostess

The makers of Thomas’ English muffins and Tastykake snacks are emerging as two of the bidders for Wonder Bread and other Hostess bread brands as the company tries to sell off its assets, a newspaper reported Saturday.

The Wall Street Journal said Hostess Brands Inc. could reveal as early as next week that Flowers Foods Inc. and Grupo Bimbo SAB are in discussions to acquire the bread brands. The report said the brands could command $350 million.

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