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Associated Press
Kentucky’s John Calipari, left, and Louisville’s Rick Pitino greet each other after the Wildcats won a Final Four game in New Orleans in April.

Battle for Bluegrass supremacy

– Louisville has had enough of losing to Kentucky.

The No. 4 Cardinals have dropped four in a row to the Wildcats, including last spring’s national semifinal in New Orleans. Kentucky won that game 69-61 and went on to beat Kansas two days later for its eighth national championship.

That Final Four loss still bothers Cardinals coach Rick Pitino, who is 0-4 against Wildcats counterpart John Calipari. Fortunately for Pitino, he enters today’s showdown in Louisville with an experienced team that’s 11-1 and favored to reclaim Bluegrass State supremacy.

Kentucky (8-3) started the season No. 3 behind Indiana and Louisville. But the Wildcats have fallen from the rankings and are looking to establish themselves with another group of talented freshmen.

They enter the game as an underdog against a Louisville squad that’s playing well and hungry to prove it against their archrival. However, Pitino has warned his team about getting too excited against the Wildcats.

“When it comes down to it, it’s all about execution,” Pitino said Friday. “It really is about execution. And the emotional part wears off. Sometimes emotion is a killer and it drains you. You’ve got to be very careful in this type of game that it doesn’t.”

At the same time, the Cardinals have reason to feel good about their chances. They’ve been ranked in the top six all season and have beaten quality schools such as Northern Iowa, Missouri, College of Charleston and Memphis.

Louisville has succeeded behind Pitino’s trademark: tough pressure defense. The Cardinals lead the nation in turnover margin (plus 8.6) and are second in steals at 11.9 per game.

Since their only loss this season against Duke, the Cardinals have won six straight. Their streak is notable because they’ve done so without center Gorgui Dieng, who broke his left wrist Nov. 23 during a tournament in the Bahamas.

Expected to miss four to six weeks, Dieng was cleared this week and Pitino will start the 6-foot-11 junior against Kentucky. The Senegal native’s availability isn’t surprising, considering he had been working out and dressed the past few games.

Dieng grasps the importance of the in-state rivalry – his parents will be among the sold-out crowd at the KFC Yum! Center. Louisville needs guards Peyton Siva and Russ Smith to dictate the backcourt battle against Kentucky.

Siva, a senior considered one of the nation’s best point guards, is averaging a career-best 11.4 points along with 6.3 assists and 2.3 steals.

“He’s good with the ball,” Calipari said of Siva. “He finds his teammates. He’s scoring better, shooting the ball way better.”

Smith, who came off the bench to score 30 points against Kentucky here last New Year’s Eve, has raised his scoring average from 11.5 to 19.7 points largely because of his 34-percent rate from three-point range.

As both schools maintain that today’s meeting is just another game, players and coaches acknowledge the place the rivalry holds among their fan bases. Kentucky freshman Archie Goodwin said he followed it in high school but quickly learned how different it was to be a part of it.

“It’s a big game,” he said. “It’s not just the media that really says it. ... It’s something we knew about coming in here. All schools have their rivalry and this is just one of them.”

Pitino coached Kentucky from 1989 to ’97 and won the 1996 national championship before arriving at Louisville in 2001 and leading the Cardinals to two Final Fours.

However, Pitino came to understand what the rivalry meant after last year’s semifinal loss because it denied the Cardinals a chance for their third NCAA title.

Asked if it’s the best rivalry in college basketball, Pitino paused and said, “Yeah, because we live with each other. I don’t think a Duke woman would marry a North Carolina guy. And I don’t think a North Carolina man would marry a Duke woman.

“We just intermarry all the time. It’s hurt our society here in Louisville,” he jokingly added. “And for those of you who have married a Kentucky woman, you know what I’m talking about.”

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