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The Game shines in outing

‘Jesus Piece’ The Game

The Game returns with a heavy dose of guest appearances on his fifth offering, including Lil Wayne, Chris Brown, Jamie Foxx and 2 Chainz. But like his last album, “The R.E.D. Album,” he isn’t outshined by any of the features on “Jesus Piece.”

With his hoarse delivery, The Game’s words are full of bravado, his topics are concise and his rhymes are easy to digest on these well-produced tracks. That’s certainly evident on “Pray,” featuring J. Cole and JMSN, where The Game tells a compelling story about being a “guardian angel” for a woman struggling with drug abuse.

On “Can’t Get Right,” featuring K. Roosevelt, The Game is in confession mode. He raps about his struggles to avoid the fast life and envisions through a nightmare that his mentor, Dr. Dre, was shot as a gospel choir sings background.

The Game is able to mesh his brash raps while talking about his trials of spiritual growth – especially on “Heaven’s Arms” and “See No Evil,” with Kendrick Lamar and Tank.

But the album takes a wrong turn on “Hallelujah,” where The Game opens the song praising God with the use of profanity, rapping about the struggle to overcome his worldly desires during church services.

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