You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

Music

  • Old Crown band commits to Youth Ensemble
    With a series of performances coming up this summer, including preparations to host a national competition for the next two years, the Old Crown Brass Band appear not to have much time to breathe, let alone blow.
  • Music
    ACOUSTICTODAY – Dan Smyth – 9 p.m.; Acme Bar and Grill, 1105 E. State Blvd.; no cover; 480-2263. TODAY – The Eddie Haskill Project – 9 p.m.; Deer Park Irish Pub, 1530 Leesburg Road; no cover; 432-8966.
  • Music charts
    BillboardAmong the latest national chart leaders:
Advertisement
File | Associated Press
In this April 26 photo, superstar Jenni Rivera performs during the Latin Billboard Awards in Coral Gables, Fla.

Jenni Rivera, 'Diva de la Banda,' is confirmed dead

Associated Press
Candles and pictures pay tribute to singer Jenni Rivera at the Plaza Mexico shopping center in Lynwood, Calif., early Monday.

MEXICO CITY – Jenni Rivera, the California-born singer who rose through personal adversity to become a superstar of Mexican-American music, has died in a plane crash in northern Mexico, the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board confirmed Monday.

Rivera, 43, began her career working in the office of her father's small Mexican music label in Long Beach, California. Gifted with a powerful, soulful voice, she recorded her first album, "Chacalosa," in 1995. It was a hit, and she followed it with two other independent albums, one a tribute to slain Mexican-American singer Selena.

By the end of the 90s, she won a major-label contract, and built a loyal following on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border.

A mother of five children and grandmother of two, the woman known as the "Diva de la Banda" was known for frank talk about her struggles to give a good life to her children despite a series of setbacks.

She was recently divorced from her third husband, was once detained at a Mexico City airport with tens of thousands of dollars in cash, and she publicly apologized after her brother assaulted a drunken fan who verbally attacked her in 2011.

Her openness about her personal troubles endeared her to millions in the U.S. and Mexico.

"I am the same as the public, as my fans," she told The Associated Press in an interview in March.

Rivera was widely presumed dead since the wreckage of her plane was found Sunday.

The NTSB is sending a team to assist Mexican authorities with the investigation. NTSB spokesman Keith Holloway says Mexican aviation authorities had confirmed Rivera's death to the NTSB.

Advertisement