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Briefs

Leaving hospital risks girl’s life

– A young girl with leukemia and a heart catheter could die in a matter of days if she is not brought back to an Arizona hospital after her parents inexplicably took her out of the facility last week, authorities said Monday.

The 11-year-old girl whom authorities are only calling Emily had been receiving chemotherapy at Phoenix Children’s Hospital for about a month, said Phoenix police Sgt. Steve Martos.

An infection forced doctors to amputate her right arm and insert a catheter in her heart. The device was set to be taken out before her mother removed an IV from the girl, changed her clothes and walked her out of the hospital Wednesday night.

Police said if the catheter is left in too long, it could lead to a deadly infection.

Nation

2 charged in death of Coast Guardsman

The killing of a U.S. Coast Guardsman whose crew was chasing a vessel suspected of being laden with drugs appears to be the latest example of how smugglers are venturing farther north in a game of cat-and-mouse along the California coast.

Chief Petty Officer Terrell Horne, 34, died Sunday after he was struck in the head by the suspect vessel near the Channel Islands, west of Los Angeles and about 180 miles northwest of the U.S.-Mexico border.

Two Mexican men – Jose Meija Leyva and Manuel Beltran Higuera – were charged Monday in Los Angeles with killing a federal officer while the officer was on duty.

Fort Hood massacre judge taken off case

The military’s highest court ousted the judge in the Fort Hood shooting case Monday and threw out his order to have the suspect’s beard forcibly shaved before his court-martial.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces ruled that Col. Gregory Gross didn’t appear impartial while presiding over the case of Maj. Nidal Hasan, who faces the death penalty if convicted in the 2009 shootings on the Texas Army post that killed 13 people and wounded more than two dozen others.

But the court said it was not ruling on whether the judge’s order violated Hasan’s religious rights. Hasan has argued that his beard is a requirement of his Muslim faith, although facial hair violates Army regulations.

Aunt: Killer blamed dad for Asperger’s

A man who killed his father and himself in front of a computer science class at a Wyoming community college last week was a “borderline genius” upset by the belief he had inherited Asperger’s syndrome from his dad, an aunt of the killer said Monday.

Christopher Krumm, 25, blamed Asperger’s for his trouble keeping jobs after he got a master’s degree in electrical engineering in 2009, said Barbara Nichols, of Bakersfield, Calif.

Asperger’s is associated with difficulty making social connections but is not normally associated with predilection to violent behavior.

Nichols said James Krumm told her that his son blamed him for Asperger’s.

“He said, ‘He hates me. He blames me for this Asperger’s,’ ” she said.

Police say Krumm shot 56-year-old James Krumm with an arrow and stabbed him in his Casper College classroom Friday, then fatally stabbed himself. Earlier, he fatally stabbed his father’s girlfriend, 42-year-old Heidi Arnold.

Early signs point to bad flu season

Flu season in the U.S. is off to its earliest start in nearly a decade – and it could be a bad one.

Health officials Monday said suspected flu cases have jumped in five Southern states, and the primary strain circulating tends to make people sicker than other types. It is particularly hard on the elderly.

However, more than a third of Americans have been vaccinated, and the vaccine formulated for this year is well-matched to the strains of the virus seen so far, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

World

Police investigate after tunnel deaths

Police early today were searching the offices of the company operating an expressway tunnel where hundreds of concrete ceiling slabs collapsed onto moving vehicles below, killing nine people.

Those killed in Sunday’s accident were traveling in three vehicles in the 3-mile-long Sasago Tunnel about 50 miles west of Tokyo. The transport ministry has ordered inspections of 49 other highway and road tunnels of similar construction around the mountainous country. The tunnel, on a highway that links the capital to central Japan, opened in 1977.

Typhoon ravages southern Philippines

A powerful typhoon pounded the southern Philippines early today, cutting power, suspending travel and flooding areas already vulnerable to landslides.

More than 41,000 residents have moved out of their homes in high-risk coastal villages and along rivers, including in southern provinces that were devastated by a deadly storm a year ago.

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