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Associated Press
Ashton Kutcher stars in “jOBS,” which will be the closing night film of the Sundance Film Festival.

Lovelace, Jobs films to debut at Sundance

– Ashton Kutcher as Apple co-founder Steve Jobs and Amanda Seyfried as porn star Linda Lovelace are among the highlights at January’s Sundance Film Festival.

Kutcher headlines director Joshua Michael Stern’s “jOBS,” one of 18 star-studded premieres announced Monday for Robert Redford’s independent-cinema showcase. Chronicling 30 years in the life of the Apple mastermind who died last year, “jOBS” is the closing-night film at Sundance, which runs Jan. 17 to 27 in Park City, Utah.

Seyfried has the title role in Rob Epstein and Jeffrey Friedman’s “Lovelace,” a portrait of the adult-film actress who became an anti-porn crusader years after starring in the hardcore hit “Deep Throat.”

The roles are dramatic departures for Kutcher, best-known for broad movie comedies and the TV sitcoms , and Seyfried, best-known for romances such as “Dear John” and “Mamma Mia!”

But dramatic departures often are what it’s all about at Sundance, which presents films out of the mainstream that let top-name talent take a break from the Hollywood mold.

“A lot of these actors are looking to spread out of their comfort zones,” said Sundance director John Cooper. “It’s about doing something different for them.”

The lineup of dramas, along with 11 documentaries also announced in the premiere section Monday, play outside the roster of 64 films unveiled last week for Sundance’s U.S. and world-cinema competitions. Along with entries in the festival’s midnight section and other programs also announced last week, Sundance will offer 115 feature-length films.

Documentary premieres include Freida Mock’s “Anita,” examining the fallout from sexual-harassment charges brought by Anita Hill against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, and Alex Gibney’s “We Steal Secrets: The Story of WikiLeaks,” an analysis of the website that released classified government documents.

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