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Letters

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Letters

Fellow Hoosiers reject tea party’s mission

I share the frustration of many over the recent election. Indiana gave up a prime opportunity to re-elect Sen. Richard Lugar. Though many Hoosiers were increasingly frustrated with Lugar’s reluctance to take a conservative stance against the socialist agenda being shoved upon our nation’s citizenry, it was poor judgment to think there could be a better candidate. It was foolish to think the tea party could meddle in our nation’s affairs in an attempt to steer her toward fiscal responsibility and a smaller, constitutional government.

The socialists, progressives and liberals of the Democratic party run this nation, and that isn’t going to change. Do we follow their lead and cast aside a Constitution that assures all citizens of certain, unalienable rights and limits the power of government in exchange for big-government control?

Hoosiers fairly and squarely elected a Democratic senator who, based on his past performance in D.C., will be an extension of over-reaching government. Maybe the tea party needs to respect the wishes of fellow Hoosiers and recognize there is no room at the table for those who wish to “change Washington.”

DEBRA ZAWLOCKI South Whitley

IPFW walkers need to remember the basics

It is one of the earliest lessons adults teach children: “Stop, look, and listen before you cross the street.”

As a student who has attended IPFW off and on for the past 20 years, I’m beginning to think it needs to be re-introduced to a generation of adults who seem to have a complete disregard for moving vehicles on campus. I realize that pedestrians have the right of way on places such as college campuses and that it is the responsibility of drivers to watch out for them. But this does not absolve those on foot of common sense.

The trouble spots are along campus roads where there are no crossing markings and in parking lots. Along stretches where there are no pedestrian markings, I have seen many instances of brazen disregard for approaching cars. Individuals will simply step into the street when a car is perhaps 10 yards away.

And since when is it OK to walk through a parking lot with a line of friends spread out, blocking the flow of cars trying to make their way to empty spots? We’re all trying to get to class. Have some respect.

Drivers and walkers both need to look out for one another, no doubt. But walkers need to remember the basics.

DARREN HUNT Fort Wayne

Obama economy a dismal prospect

Before the presidential election I read that more than half of high school or college graduates in 2009 through 2011 were either jobless or underemployed and the prospect for the class of 2012 was no better.

Paul Krugman, a Princeton University economist and New York Times columnist, has written that unemployment falls when economic growth is high and rises when growth is low or negative. Krugman warns, however, that economic growth must be fast, more than 2 percent each year to keep unemployment from rising

In the debates, President Obama proudly claimed the economy had expanded for 13 straight quarters. However, the economy didn’t expand fast enough to keep up with our growing population’s need for jobs. Economic growth for the first nine months of 2012 was a paltry 1.7 percent, slower than 2011’s 1.8 percent, which was slower than 2010’s 2.4 percent. Historically, the growth rate at this stage of the past nine recoveries has averaged almost 4 percent.

Obama spent the days before the election persuading voters that 1.7 percent growth is the best we can do. Because he won, he’s probably right. Under this president we can expect slow, slowing or even negative economic growth and, concomitantly, less happiness and the liberty a good job can deliver.

This economy now completely belongs to Obama and to you who voted for him. Good luck – you will need it and so will we all.

RUSS KIRBY Fort Wayne

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