You choose, we deliver
If you are interested in this story, you might be interested in others from The Journal Gazette. Go to www.journalgazette.net/newsletter and pick the subjects you care most about. We'll deliver your customized daily news report at 3 a.m. Fort Wayne time, right to your email.

U.S.

  • Man apprehended after jumping White House fence
    WASHINGTON – The Secret Service has apprehended a man who jumped over the White House fence.
  • Expert says Detroit bankruptcy plan feasible
    Detroit's plan to get out of bankruptcy is feasible, a court-appointed expert testified Wednesday as the last witness in a historic trial to determine whether the largest city in U.S. history to file for Chapter 9 can get back on its feet.
  • Experts: Autopsy shows close-range wound for Brown
    Michael Brown's official autopsy shows the 18-year-old was shot in the hand at close range during a struggle with the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot him, two experts said in a published report Wednesday.
Advertisement
Associated Press
In the Far Rockaways section of Queens, volunteers knock on doors Saturday to provide food and supplies to residents still without power.

Sandy still hurting the sick, frail

Vital supply lines cut off in parts of NYC still dark

– Some of society’s most vulnerable people – the elderly, the disabled and the chronically ill – have been pushed to the brink in the powerless, flood-ravaged neighborhoods struggling to recover from Superstorm Sandy.

The storm didn’t just knock out electricity and destroy property when it came ashore in places like the Far Rockaway section of Queens. It disrupted the fragile support networks that allowed the neighborhood’s frailest residents to get by.

Here, the catastrophe has closed pharmacies, kept home care aides from getting to elderly clients and made getting around in a wheelchair impossible. The city has recorded at least two deaths of older men in darkened buildings.

For some living in the disaster zone, it has all been too much.

When a team of medics and National Guardsmen turned up at Sheila Goldberg’s apartment tower in Far Rockaway on Friday to check on the well-being of residents, floor by floor, the 75-year-old burst into tears and begged for help caring for her 85-year-old husband.

Her husband, Irwin, has a pacemaker, wears a colostomy bag, and needs her help to do almost everything. When the power was on, Goldberg said, “I could take care of him by myself and survive.”

But for days, the building had no heat or electricity. There were no open stores to buy food. Until the end of the week, there was no water or elevators, meaning residents like the Goldbergs, on the 25th floor, had to cart water up the steps themselves just to flush the toilet. A stench permeates the building.

“I’m running out of my blood pressure medication. We’re both going to drop dead in this apartment,” Sheila said. The medical team said it would make arrangements to transfer Irwin to a medical facility, at least temporarily.

Paramedics from all over the country, including the ones that found the Goldbergs, fanned out across the Rockaways this weekend to check on shut-ins and anyone else who might need help.

The idea was to find people who “sheltered in place” during the storm, who might need assistance, said Nancy Clark, an assistant commissioner in the city’s health department.

Two floors below the Goldbergs, medics from South Carolina found Daisy Nixon, 70, slumped in a chair under a pile of blankets. A diabetic and a victim of two strokes, she was suffering from an untreated dislocated shoulder injured before the storm. Nate Thompson, an EMT, checked her blood glucose levels and found them troublingly high.

“It’s been cold. Lord, have mercy,” Nixon said. She said she was also having trouble breathing at night. When Thompson said he would get her an ambulance, Nixon was overjoyed.

“Can I kiss you? Don’t you walk away from me,” she said, and planted a smooch on his cheek.

Advertisement